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TASMANIAN CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION



Available from 2009, the Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE) is a qualification for Tasmanians who reach the five standards.

The qualification has been developed in consultation with a wide range of stakeholders including employers, industry bodies, education and training providers, parent and community bodies, schools and colleges.

To get this qualification a person must meet - or do better than - requirements for standards in:
  • everyday adult reading, writing and communication
  • everyday adult mathematics
  • everyday adult use of computers and the internet
  • the amount and level of participation and achievement in education and training
  • pathway planning.

People can meet these requirements in different ways, in different settings and over different periods of time. People can meet these standards through a school or college program, through a VET program, through an apprenticeship, at TasTAFE and through a mix of part-time study and training. Some employers may offer a program of work and training that will allow someone to meet the standards for getting the Tasmanian Certificate of Education.

Below are quick links to topics on this page. Additional information about the TCE can be accessed via the Tasmanian Certificate of Education sub-menu.

Meeting the Standards
When is the TCE issued? What happens if I do not meet the standards?
TCE Planner Tool
What is the value of the TCE to me?
TCE


The Tasmanian Certificate of Education course document:

TasmanianCertificateofEducationCourse TCE course document
(Updated Jan 20, 2016)
(Valid from Jan 1, 2013)
(Expires Dec 31, 2017)



Meeting the Standards


1) Everyday adult reading, writing and communication skills standard


The standard is 'everyday adult reading, writing and communication' - for example, reading procedures and instructions, interpreting information from diagrams, graphs and charts, writing a brief formal letter, using questions to gather information and provide a report.

A learner will usually demonstrate that they have met the standard by gaining a 'pass' award in a course identified as having the appropriate content and standards (e.g. a 'SA' in Foundation English). Alternatively they may have to sit and pass a 'safety-net' test.

2) Everyday adult mathematics skills standard


The standard is 'everyday adult mathematics' - for example, using common maths knowledge and skills to measure, solve basic problems, develop budgets, collect survey information and interpret it, and carry out calculations involving fractions and metric quantities.

A learner will usually demonstrate that they have met the standard by gaining a 'pass' award in a course identified as having the appropriate content and standards (e.g. a 'SA' in Workplace Maths, Level 2). Alternatively they may have to sit and pass a 'safety-net' test.

3) Everyday adult use of computers and the internet standard


The standard is 'everyday adult use of computers and the internet - for example, using a computer, using a word processor and spreadsheet, sending and receiving e-mails, and using the internet responsibly.

A learner will usually demonstrate that they have met the standard by gaining a 'pass' award in a course identified as having the appropriate content and standards (e.g. a 'Pass' in Computing, Level 2). Alternatively they may have to sit and pass a 'safety-net' test.

Since May 2015 TASC has accepted provider-level evidence that learners at approved schools/colleges have achieved the 'everyday adult' use of computers and the internet standard. Click HERE for more information.

    "How do I reach the 'everyday adult skill set standards?"
    TASC expects students in formal learning programs with senior secondary providers to demonstrate that they have met the standards of the 'everyday adult' skill sets in literacy, numeracy and ICT through course pathways (e.g. successfully undertaking an English course that has been identified as having content and standards that suggest that successful completion indicates that a learner has met the TCE literacy standard).

    "Which courses have been identified as having appropriate content and standards?"
    The TCE Planner tools explained here can be used to see if a TASC accredited senior secondary course or a TASC recognised formal learning qualification ('pass' award or better) will be considered evidence that a learner has reach one or more of the 'everyday adult' skill set standards

    "What if I do not sucessfully complete one of these kinds of courses to demonstrate that I have reached an 'everyday adult' standard?"
    A small minority of students may not have such course pathways or - at the end of year 12 - not have successfully completed a course indicating that they have met the standards of one or more of the 'everyday adult' skill sets.

    People who want a TCE but are not currently enrolled in education and training institutions might need to demonstrate their skills in ways other than completing a course or qualification.

    In such cases 'safety-net' testing of the skill set will be available.

    For more on safety-net testing, click here: Safety-net Testing

4) Participation and Achievement Standard


The TCE requires 'a significant amount of learning at a set standard'. We will recognise a very broad range of learning, and are very flexible about where, when and how that learning happens.

To do this, we give each type of learning a 'credit point' value. A credit-point value shows the amount of learning at a set standard that can count towards the TCE. To meet the participation and achievement standard for the TCE, a person will need to have 120 credit points in education and training, with at least 80 credit points in studies at TASC level 2.

Many learners will show that they meet or do better than this standard with a reasonably challenging two-year program of study at senior secondary level with at least 1,200 hours of study in senior secondary subjects. Others will show that they meet or do better than this standard with a full program of VET studies. Some people will use combinations of senior secondary studies, VET, and other qualifications we recognise. Some people will complete an apprenticeship to show that they meet or do better than this standard.

The TCE Planner tool explained here can be used to calculate credit points and other standards. Remember the Planner Tools' calculations are based on the assumption that a learner successfully completes a course/qualification.

For the reading, writing and communication, mathematics, and use of computers and the internet standards 'successful completion' means getting a 'Pass/SA' award or better.

For the participation and achievement standard it means gaining an award, so a 'PA' or better can generate the credit points used to measure this standard.



Common questions about Vocational Education and Training (VET) and the TCE


How can learners request VET qualifications/units be added to their TASC record for TCE calculations and so that they appear on their Qualifications Certificate?
If your RTO has not reported to TASC that you gained a VET qualification or statement of attainment for VET unit/s they will not appear on your TASC Statement of Results (issued at the end of year 11), nor on your Qualifications Certificate, nor will they be used in the calculation of credit points for your TCE.
You can:
  • ask your TASC Liaison Officer to send a copy of your qualification/statement of attainment to TASC with your name and other details
  • send TASC a certified copy (not original) of the qualification/statement of attainment along with your name, DoB, address and TASC number (if know).

How can RTOs request new qualifications/units be added to the TCE and its related planner tools?
You can request the addition of other nationally recognised VET qualifications and/or units of competency to the TCE Planner Tool via the webpage: Adding new VET qualifications or units of competency to the TCE Planner Tools


5) 'Planning Future Education and Career' Standard


This standards has two elements: developing and lodging a pathway plan; and reviewing the plan.

Developing and lodging a pathway plan
Students completing year 10 from the end of 2007 have been required to lodge a 'participation record' with TASC under the Guaranteeing Futures Act 2004. This statement of intent specifies the first and second preferences for post-year 10 education, employment and training options.

The TCE requires a person 'to have developed and reviewed plans for education and training'. Most students will meet this standard by developing a plan during Year 10 and reviewing their progress at some time before they finish their senior secondary education and training. From 2007, all Tasmanian schools have been required to make sure that Year-10 students develop a pathway plan and register it with us by the end of the year. A student's plan will include their career goals and the education and training they need to reach these goals.

Reviewing one's pathway plan
How an individual reviews their pathway plan will depend on many factors such as their personal situation and arrangements made by their educational and training institution. Rather than say how a review is to be done TASC requires that the Principal/CEO formally notifies us that learners have undertaken such a review. For more information see: Pathway Planning Requirements

    "What about learners who have not lodged a plan, like those from interstate or overseas, or adult learners? What if you do not attend a formal education/training institution?"
    We will make special arrangements for people in these kinds of situations. For more information see: Pathway Planning Requirements


When is the TCE issued? What happens if I do not meet the standards?


The TCE is automatically issued to year 12 learners IF they have met the five standards. Other learners who meet the standards can apply to TASC to have it issued.

As a qualification the TCE is only issued if a learner meets the standards. There is no time limit on meeting the standards and any credit points or 'everyday adult' skill set standards reached to not expire.

A student who undertook senior secondary studies before 2009 AND who met all the requirements for completion at that time is NOT eligible to be awarded a TCE as a result of any subsequent studies.

Example:
A learner did not gain the TCE at the end of year 12 because they did not meet the participation and achievement standard. After completing some university study or a VET qualification they then reached the standard. The learner can then ask TASC to issue them with a TCE.


Information for Students who completed Year 12 prior to 2009


If you met the requirements for the TCE prior to 2009 then you are NOT eligible to be issued with the current TCE (that was introduced at the end of 2009).

If however you did not meet the requirements for a TCE prior to 2009 but have subsequently completed additional study which would enable a current TCE to be issued, this will be done automatically once the results have been added to your record.


TCE Planner Tool


TASC has developed a TCE Planner tool. Find out more at: http://www.tasc.tas.gov.au/3666



What value is the Tasmanian Certificate of Education to me?


The Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE) is a significant qualification marking the end of a person's first stage of lifelong learning after compulsory school.

Tasmanian employers have told us they are very supportive of this qualification because its standards match important skills people need when entering the adult world, including employment and further education and training.

"Stillwater sees future potential for the Tasmanian Certificate of Education both in its recruitment of post-Year 12 employees, where having agreed minimum standards across the identified requirements can assure employee capability and in its application to post-year 10 apprentices as a valued outcome along with their trade qualification." Kim Seagram, Stillwater River Cafe, Restaurant and Wine Bar.

"There is potential for the Tasmanian Certificate of Education to complement training in the seafood industry with other education and training, including school-based traineeships during Years 11 and 12." Josh Poke, Human Resources Manager, Bolduans Bay Oysters, Smithton.

"The Tasmanian Certificate of Education could be a useful complement to a broader strategy to improve awareness of career opportunities in rural industries. Education and training is generally considered vital in the support of innovation across rural industry." Gwen Norman, Tasmanian Farmers and Graziers Association.

Other education and training providers, including the University of Tasmania, also support the TCE.

"The certificate sends strong signals to young people, and those involved in teaching, that increasing educational attainment is extremely important to the social and economic future of Tasmania and young Tasmanians." Professor Gail Hart (Pro Vice-Chancellor, Teaching and Learning, University of Tasmania.


From year 12 in 2016, to be eligible for an ATAR a student will have to have met the standards for the award of the TCE. See http://www.tasc.tas.gov.au/34934 for information.

Below is a link to the list of 2015 Year 12 students who received an ATAR of 98.5 or better.

2015 students with an ATAR of 98.5 or better


Below is a link to the list of 2015 Year 12 students who gained an Outstanding Achievement award in either the VET or Academic category. These awards were presented at Government House on 2 February 2016.

2015 Outstanding Achievement award recipients
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